Fellowship Program

The Division of Infectious Diseases Fellowship Training Program is an ACGME approved program designed to attract outstanding young physicians and train them for academic and clinical careers in infectious diseases.

How to apply

Welcome to Our Fellowship Program

Welcome to the Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM). The goal of our fellowship program is to train outstanding clinicians and physician-scientists in the subspecialty of infectious diseases.

All of our program’s graduates receive excellent training in inpatient and outpatient infectious diseases. Many graduates become physician-scientists who perform high quality laboratory-based research or investigators who engage in clinical research. Others become successful educators, epidemiologists, administrators, or private infectious disease clinicians.

Our faculty are engaged in a wide range of  clinical services and research from which our fellows gain experience. These include

At WUSM, we strive for excellence in clinical care, education, and research. We are pleased that you are interested in learning more about our Infectious Diseases Fellowship and invite you to explore our website. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have questions or we can provide further information.

Sincerely,

                           

Nigar Kirmani, MD

Professor of Medicine
Program Director

Gerome Escota, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine
Associate Program Director

Stephanie Montgomery, BS

Fellowship Coordinator
314.454.8276
montgomery.stephanie@wustl.edu

​​Overview

Five fellows are selected each year. The Infectious Diseases Fellowship is an integrated, two-year program that combines broad and intensive training in clinical infectious diseases with protected time to pursue basic or clinical research after the first year. A third research year is offered to fellows engaged in funded, productive research projects in infectious diseases.

In an effort to provide the highest quality care in both inpatient and outpatient settings, faculty of the Division and their colleagues in the departments of Molecular Microbiology, Biology, Cell Biology and Physiology, Pathology and Genetics foster and maintain excellent communication between basic scientists and clinicians. The fellowship training program places a high value on a fertile collaborative atmosphere in which basic and clinical investigations alike are pursued to advance the forefront of knowledge relevant to understanding the pathogenesis, pathophysiology, clinical consequences and treatment of infectious diseases.

Program goal

Our program aims to train fellows to be excellent clinicians and well-trained physician-scientists doing clinical, translational or basic science research. Our fellows should be prepared to respond to national and global challenges such as emerging infectious diseases, rising antimicrobial resistance, and threats to public health and patient safety. Whether they choose clinical or research careers, become educators, choose public health careers, or work for industry, we want to inculcate a culture of excellence that they will adhere to throughout their careers. We want to foster values that stress honesty, integrity, and fairness in all their dealings. In addition, we want to encourage them to provide compassionate clinical care and respect diversity in their patient population.

Learn about past trainees’ achievements on our alumni page.

Clinical

Our fellows gain a wealth of clinical experience from patients seen at Barnes Jewish Hospital, one of the largest hospitals in the United States with over 1,400 beds. The Infectious Diseases Fellowship is an integrated, two year program that combines broad and intensive training in clinical infectious diseases with protected time to pursue basic or clinical research after the first year. A third research year is offered to fellows engaged in funded, productive research projects in infectious diseases.

  • There is also an attending-only Bone and Joint Service
  • 3 weeks of vacation in both years
  • Global Health Track available as an option for 2nd Year

Optional Third Year

  • Continue research pursuits
  • No inpatient requirements
  • 1-3 clinics per week depending on clinical/research track

First year of fellowship

The first year of fellowship is devoted to clinical care and infectious disease consultation on inpatient services at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and the St. Louis Veterans Administration Medical Center (John Cochran). Under the supervision and mentorship of an attending physician, fellows will gain practical and wide-ranging experience in managing infectious diseases in a large urban academic medical center. These busy services provide more than 2,000 inpatient consultations annually.

A dedicated, transplant infectious diseases consult service follows complex and challenging infections in both solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant populations. A bone and joint consult service provides concentrated exposure to orthopedic infections.

Elective time during the first year affords ample opportunity to identify and meet with potential faculty mentors as fellows make plans to pursue research in later years. Electives in Patient Safety, Infection Prevention, Hepatology, Bone and Joint Infection and Pediatric Infectious Diseases are available. Additionally, a 2-week clinical microbiology option provides exposure to clinical microbiology, including bench time in different areas.

Finally, fellows will provide outpatient HIV primary care including care of patients co-infected with HCV and HBV, and infectious disease consultation one half-day a week at the Washington University Infectious Diseases Clinic year round (Ambulatory curriculum). Additional training experiences are also available at the St. Louis County Department of Health Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Tuberculosis Clinics.

Second year of fellowship

The concentration of clinical work in the first year allows fellows to pursue research and scholarly activities in their second year and beyond.  The second year of fellowship allows protected time to pursue research. The Division holds a NIH Infectious Disease/Basic Microbial Pathogenesis Training Grant, now in its 35+ continuous years of funding. More than 30 full-time faculty in the basic and clinical sciences participate in the training of infectious diseases fellows. A great deal of flexibility is accorded fellows in their choice of research mentors. A faculty advisory committee formed for each fellow will assure that their training goals are achieved. Opportunities to participate in formal didactic research training are available to interested fellows through the Clinical Research Training Center (CRTC) at Washington University School of Medicine.

Fellows pursuing research are offered multiple opportunities for funding additional training.

A Global Health Track available as an option for 2nd Year.

Third year of fellowship

An optional third year of research is offered to fellows interested in an academic career pursuing research in basic science or clinical research.  It allows fellows time to complete their projects, write manuscripts and grant proposals.  Fellows may be appointed as instructors and serve as attendings on the clinical services.

Research

The basic research laboratories of the fellowship training program are focused on investigations into the pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, viral, and mycobacterial diseases and the host immunologic responses which control these infections. Washington University has a highly collaborative research environment and fellows are welcome to join a lab in any department or division in the University. Fellows have joined labs in other clinical divisions in Internal Medicine, and in other departments, including Microbiology, Pathology and Immunology, and Genetics. Fellows in basic research training are traditionally supported by the Division’s NIH-sponsored Infectious Diseases/Basic Microbial Pathogenesis Training Grant. Our fellows have also been very successful in competing for extramural funding through the NIH, including obtaining K08 and K23 awards. Washington University is also home to a premier Medical Science Training Program (MSTP) whose mission is to train future leaders in medicine and science.

The Clinical Research Training Center (CRTC), a component of the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS), provides didactic curriculum and mentored training in clinical and translational research for predoctoral students, house-staff, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty. Our fellows have been successful in competing for admission to the Postdoctoral Program and subsequent institutional career development award programs (KL2, KM1) in clinical, translational, and comparative effectiveness research.

Funding Opportunities

Multiple funding opportunities for funding additional training in research exist for fellows in their second year and beyond. These opportunities exist through:

Our fellows have been highly successful in obtaining grant funding through:

AIDS Clinical Trials Unit (ACTU)

The Division of Infectious Diseases operates a NIH-supported AIDS Clinical Trials Unit (ACTU), with more than 200 new patients enrolled in clinical trials annually. The presence of the ACTU, coupled with an active outpatient HIV clinic that follows approximately 1700 HIV-positive patients, offers many clinical research opportunities in HIV disease and AIDS (including training in the design and conduct of clinical trials) as well as the opportunity for training in state-of-the-art care for HIV-positive patients. Collaborative research opportunities with investigators conducting clinical and laboratory research in HIV-related virology, neurology, hepatology and malignancy are also available, as are active clinical research and training programs in sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis.

Clinical Research Training Center (CRTC)

The Clinical Research Training Center (CRTC), a component of the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS), provides didactic curriculum and mentored training in clinical and translational research for predoctoral students, house-staff, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty. Past infectious diseases fellows have been successful in competing for admission to the Postdoctoral Program and subsequent institutional career development award programs (KL2, KM1) in clinical, translational, and comparative effectiveness research.

Basic, translational and clinical research opportunities

The basic research laboratories of the fellowship training program operate with the philosophy that investigations into the pathogenesis of infectious diseases are carried out at the highest possible molecular resolution. Laboratories are focused on investigations into the pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, viral, and mycobacterial diseases and the host immunologic responses which control these infections.

Washington University has a highly collaborative research environment and fellows are welcome to join a lab in any department or division in the University. Fellows have joined labs in other clinical divisions in Internal Medicine, including pulmonary, hematology-oncology, renal, gastrointestinal, and allergy divisions. Fellows have also joined labs in other departments, including Microbiology, Pathology and Immunology, and Genetics.

Fellows in basic research training are traditionally supported by the Division’s NIH-sponsored Infectious Diseases/Basic Microbial Pathogenesis Training Grant. Additional funding opportunities are available through the Biodefense Clinical/Translational Research Fellowship program, sponsored by the Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (MRCE), as well as numerous private organizations, including the Doris Duke Foundation and Burroughs-Wellcome. Our fellows have also been very successful in competing for extramural funding through the NIH, including obtaining K08 and K23 awards.

Washington University is also home to a premier Medical Science Training Program (MSTP) whose mission is to train future leaders in medicine and science.

Conferences

The program has meticulously designed conferences that showcase the complexity and diversity of cases seen in the hospital, the expertise of the faculty on various infectious disease topics, and the program’s commitment in fellow education. Click here for weekly conference schedule.

DAY Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
8:00 AM Grand Rounds Core Curriculum
12:00 PM HIV/Hepatitis

Journal Club/Research
Conference

Translational
Research Conference/
Basic Science Lunch

ID Grand Rounds: Fellows prepare and present interesting and unusual cases in this weekly conference. They present a literature review of the topic under discussion. ID Grand Rounds are held at Barnes-Jewish Hospital South in Scarpellino Auditorium (1st Floor of hospital, Mallinckrodt Radiology Department).

HIV and Hepatitis conference:  Interesting cases and management challenges, including multi-drug resistant HIV, are discussed at this meeting weekly. In addition, diagnostic and management issues pertaining to Hepatitis B and C mono- or co-infection are likewise discussed. Activities include case presentations, journal clubs, and lectures on important topics in HIV and Hepatitis. This is held in NWT, 15th floor, large conference room.

Core Curriculum Lecture: This is a didactic curriculum taught by ID faculty once a week. It includes formal instruction in infection control, anti-infective therapy, and pathogenic mechanisms of a wide variety of bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. Activities for board review are also included (e.g. ID Jeopardy, ID Photo Quiz, review of board questions). Core curriculum lectures are held in NWT, 15th Floor, large conference.

Journal Club: Fellows critique a current journal article, and research the literature on the topic under discussion in this monthly conference. Journal Club is held on the 1st Thursday of each month in NWT, 15th Floor, large conference room.

Research Conference: Fellow and faculty present updates on their research projects on the 3rd Thursday of each

Translational Research Conference: A venue that fosters collaboration between the basic and clinical branches of the ID Division. Activities include journal review and case presentation. This is held on th 4th Friday of every month.

Basic Science Lunch: Fellows spend lunch with basic scientists to talk about career opportunities and translational research1st Friday of every month.

St. Louis

The medical campus and Barnes-Jewish Hospital is located in a cosmopolitan neighborhood where sleek modern meets National Historic District. Best known for its culinary delights, galleries and residential variety, the Central West End is an ethnically and economically diverse neighborhood. The CWE “downtown” radiates off Euclid Avenue, which runs from inside campus north to Delmar Boulevard.

Explore St. Louis »

Apply

Candidates to the Division of Infectious Diseases Fellowship Training Program must have a MD, MD/PhD, or DO and have completed an accredited residency training program in internal medicine.

Applications for fellowship are accepted beginning July 15th and should be submitted through ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service).

All supporting documents, including three letters of recommendation, should be submitted through ERAS.

Invitations to interview will begin after July 15th.

Fellow stipends range from $63,837 to $68,679 per annum, depending on previous training. Cost of Living in St. Louis, MO is 6% lower than the National Average but the fun and culture of a big city are readily available.

Fellowship coordinator

Stephanie Montgomery, BS
Phone:  314-454-8276
Fax:  314-454-8687
Email: montgomery.stephanie@wustl.edu

 


Washington University encourages and gives full consideration to all applicants for admission, financial aid, and employment. The University does not discriminate in access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, age, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, veteran status, or disability. Inquiries about compliance should be addressed to the University’s Executive Director of Human Resources, Washington University, Campus Box 1184, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899.